Abe Lincoln History


Quotes
- Lincoln Memes
- Famous Quotes
- Leadership Quotes
- Religious Quotes
- Slavery Quotes

Letters
- Grace Bedell
- Letter to Mrs. Bixby

Writings
- Emancipation Proclamation

Speeches
- Lyceum Address
- Peoria Speech
- Temperance Address
- House Divided Speech
- Cooper Union Address
- Farewell to Springfield
- Address at Independence Hall
- First Inaugural Address
- Second Inaugural Address
- Last Public Address
- The Gettysburg Address

Assassination
- 5 Facts
- Abraham's Dream
- John Wilkes Booth
- Assassination Conspirators
- Assassination Timeline
- Assassination Summary
- Artifacts

Family
- Mary Todd Lincoln
- Robert Todd Lincoln
- Tad Lincoln
- Willie Lincoln


 

Abe Lincoln Slavery Quotes

I'm naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong.
1809-1865. 16th president of the United States (1861–65), who preserved the Union during the American Civil War and brought about the emancipation of the slaves.

History credits Abe Lincoln with preserving the Union during the American Civil War and bringing about the emancipation of America's slaves.There can be no doubt of Lincoln 's deep and sincere devotion to the cause of personal freedom. Below is a sampling of my favorite Abe Lincoln salvery quotes.
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"I am naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong."

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“Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves”
From the April 6, 1859, letter to Henry Pierce
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“Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.”
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"Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought. Let us have faith that right makes might and in that faith let us; to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it. "

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"Freedom is the last, best hope of earth. "

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"We have, as all will agree, a free Government, where every man has a right to be equal with every other man. In this great struggle, this form of Government and every form of human right is endangered if our enemies succeed."

From the August 22, 1864, speech to the One Hundred Sixty-Fourth Ohio Regiment
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"Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God; and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces; but let us judge not that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered; that of neither has been answered fully."
From the March 4, 1865, Inaugural Address
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"The slave-breeders and slave-traders, are a small, odious and detested class, among you; and yet in politics, they dictate the course of all of you, and are as completely your masters, as you are the master of your own negroes."
From the August 24, 1855, letter to Joshua Speed

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"I believe this Government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free."
From the June 16, 1858, “House Divided” speech
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"This is a world of compensations; and he who would be no slave, must consent to have no slave."
From the April 6, 1859, letter to Henry Pierce

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"I am naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. I can not remember when I did not so think, and feel. And yet I have never understood that the Presidency conferred upon me an unrestricted right to act officially upon this judgment and feeling."
From the April 4, 1864, letter to Albert Hodges

A House Divided
A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half-slave and half-free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved - I do not expect the house to fall - but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.

All Men are Created Equal
Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Superior and Inferior
I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in anyway the social and political equality of the white and black races - that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race. I say upon this occasion I do not perceive that because the white man is to have the superior position the negro should be denied everything.

Giving Freedom to the Slave
In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free - honorable alike in what we give, and what we preserve. We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope of earth. Other means may succeed; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just - a way which, if followed, the world will forever applaud, and God must forever bless.

Paramount Object in this Struggle
My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union. I shall do less whenever I shall believe what I am doing hurts the cause, and I shall do more whenever I shall believe doing more will help the cause.

Arguing for Slavery
Whenever I hear any one arguing for slavery I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.

 
 
Abe Lincoln History